Hasso-Plattner-Institut
  
 

HPI Business Plan Competition 2016

A student team from Hasso Plattner Institute (HPI) won the Business Plan Competition 2016 and was awarded material support totaling around € 100,000. Three of the 27 teams made it to the final round.

The winners of the Business Plan Competition 2016: Benjamin Karran and Adrian Sieber from the Feram team, and the jury: Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel, Yair Re'em (HP Ventures), Christoph Hartmann (HPI alumnus and founder), and Dr. Manuel Effenberg director of the E-School). (Photo: HPI/K. Herschelmann)

The student team Feram convinced the jury with their program that automatically finds software errors and were selected as the winner of the fourth Business Plan Competition of Hasso Plattner Institute (HPI). For the first time, the competition was held in cooperation with the HPI Seed Fund. On the afternoon of 13 September, students Adrian Sieber (24) and Benjamin Karran (28) received the award of seed capital and support totaling € 100,000 to implement their business idea.

The founder duo pitched a user-friendly and open program that automatically finds and fixes errors in software. “Many errors that occur in software today cost companies money, time, and nerves, although this situation could be prevented with automated error detection and correction,” says Adrian Sieber. Feram’s advantage, when compared to other software, is found in a simple integration. “We want to use the award to implement more modules in the program and to acquire our first customers so that Feram becomes known,” says Benjamin Karran. Both founders studied IT-systems engineering at HPI.

Altogether 27 founder teams associated with HPI took part in the competition. Three of them made it to the finale after several selection rounds.   

“Despite the very good job offers for IT professionals in all sectors, many students have the desire and the will to attempt to make their own business ideas a reality and set off on the path to self-employment. It is our goal to support their promising ideas,” says the HPI Institute Director and CEO, Professor Christoph Meinel. Together with other the jury members, Yair Re'em, Managing Partner of Hasso Plattner Ventures, Christoph Hartmann, HPI alumnus and co-founder of VulcanoSec, and Dr. Manuel Effenberg, Head of the E-School, Meinel congratulated the winners and handed over a symbolic check for € 100,000.

An overview of the finalists

Team Feram

The founder duo Adrian Sieber (24) and Benjamin Karran (28) pitched a user-friendly and open program that automatically finds errors in software. “Many errors that occur in software today cost companies money, time, and nerves, although this could be prevented with automated error detection and correction,” says Adrian Sieber. The advantage of Feram compared with other software is a simple integration. Both founders studied IT systems engineering at HPI.

Team WeMingo

The founder-trio WeMingo consists of HPI graduate and computer scientist Johannes Schirrmeister (27), economist Moritz Kaminski (28) and psychologist Pavle Zagorscak (28). Their offer is potentially intended for the more than 3 million Germans who suffer from social phobias and are overly worried or fearful about embarrassing themselves in front of others or being negatively judged by them. In this situation, difficulties frequently arise in eating, writing, speaking, or even using the toilet in the presence of others. "Only a fraction of mental disorders are treated nowadays. WeMingo is the first online offer developed for specific social phobias and helps people who are not reached by current health care provisions," says Johannes Schirrmeister.

Team Patya analytics

The team of Corinne Petroschke (26), Jonas Kemper (27) and Elisabeth Reitmayr (28) came up with a software for data processing that is especially designed for business consultants. The innovator team’s first product called PrepJet is an Excel add-in that simplifies and speeds up the most common data processing steps. “From our own experience we know that business consultants spend a lot of time on data processing. However, many of the necessary, repetitive activities can be automated,” explains HPI student Jonas Kemper.