Cooperating with a Non-governmental Organization to Teach Gathering and Implementation of Requirements (bibtex)
by , , ,
Abstract:
Teaching Requirements Engineering needs to be a realistic experience. Otherwise the students might not understand the repercussions of failing to gather requirements correctly. While simulated stakeholders are always a feasible option, only real stakeholders offer an authentic experi- ence since only they are impacted by the system that is being specified. In this paper, we present our experiences of cooperating with the non-governmental organization (NGO) Wasserwacht. In a first requirements engineering course, nine graduate students elicited requirements by interviewing a dozen heterogenous stakeholders. In a subsequent bachelor�s project, four undergraduate students continued by implementing the software system based on these requirements. We discuss the authenticity of our requirements engineering setting the influence of the collected requirements on the follow-up implementation project and how the Wasserwacht benefited from this cooperation.
Reference:
Cooperating with a Non-governmental Organization to Teach Gathering and Implementation of Requirements (Gregor Gabrysiak, Lukas Pirl, Regina Hebig, Holger Giese), In Proc. of the 26th Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, 2013.
Bibtex Entry:
@InProceedings{GPHG13---TeachingRequirementsEngineeringWW,
AUTHOR = {Gabrysiak, Gregor and Pirl, Lukas and Hebig, Regina and Giese, Holger},
TITLE = {{Cooperating with a Non-governmental Organization to Teach Gathering and Implementation of Requirements}},
YEAR = {2013},
MONTH = {May},
BOOKTITLE = {Proc. of the 26th Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training},
SERIES = {CSEE\&T'13},
ABSTRACT = {Teaching Requirements Engineering needs to be a realistic experience. 	Otherwise the students might not understand the repercussions of 	failing to gather requirements correctly. While simulated stakeholders 	are always a feasible option, only real stakeholders offer an authentic 	experi- ence since only they are impacted by the system that is being 	specified. In this paper, we present our experiences of cooperating 	with the non-governmental organization (NGO) Wasserwacht. In a first 	requirements engineering course, nine graduate students elicited 	requirements by interviewing a dozen heterogenous stakeholders. In 	a subsequent bachelor\^{a}��s project, four undergraduate students continued 	by implementing the software system based on these requirements. We discuss the authenticity of our requirements engineering setting 	the influence of the collected requirements on the follow-up implementation project and how the Wasserwacht benefited from this cooperation.}
}
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